Question Description

I’m working on a cultural studies discussion question and need an explanation and answer to help me learn.

Why did Reconstruction fail? Who was president and why was he a failure in regards to Reconstruction? Should the Southern leadership have been punished?  

ReadingsDuring Reconstruction, over 2,000 African Americans were elected to public office, from local level to US Senate. Post-Reconstruction racial motivations prompted gerrymandering throughout the South to redraw districts in order for the Democratic Party to regain and retain control for all levels (local, state, national) of political office. This system and the creation of new state constitutions allowed Democrats to oust African American and white Republicans and dominate southern politics from late nineteenth century up to the time of the Civil Rights Movement. Democrats Resent Black Participation in Politics Black participation in politics survived the end of Reconstruction, but was systematically eroded through legal and extralegal measures. Democrats, led by wealthy landowners and supported by white yeomen farmers, became more militant in the late nineteenth century. The party came to resent even the limited participation of black people in politics that the older generation of more conservative, paternalistic wealthy white Southerners had allowed. • Following the end of Reconstruction and Redemption of Southern whites, political leaders sought to reform voting rights in order to disenfranchise African American voters. This task had to be approached with the understanding that they could not violate the Fifteenth Amendment, which gave all men the right to vote regardless of race. Throughout the South, states passed literacy tests, poll taxes, and reinvigorated property qualifications to restrict the privilege of voting.Mississippi called a constitutional convention to rewrite their state’s constitution in 1890. The state’s reasoning was that the nation had went through a Civil War and Reconstruction and it would be appropriate to reflect the changes by creating a new constitution to adequately govern their citizens. The intent was to end black voting without stating it as such. Complex voting requirements involving proof of residency, payment of all taxes, a poll tax, and restrictions on those accused of so-called “black crimes” but not “white crimes” became the benchmark for all other Southern states to rewrite their constitutions. In addition, a literacy requirement was put in place, but could be waived if an illiterate man could demonstrate he understood the constitution if it was read to him. The power to determine understanding was placed in the hands of white voting registrars. In 1895, South Carolina passed a similar “understanding clause.” Segregation and racial discrimination impacted all aspects of daily life in the South. After Reconstruction, the legal justice system became increasingly white and discriminatory. Most attorneys and all judges were white. Court personnel treated black plaintiffs, defendants, and witnesses with contempt. Black people were more often charged with crimes, and almost always convicted. Defendants accused of committing crimes against a black person were often charged with lesser crimes. Since Reconstruction, education became an avenue for African Americans to better themselves and improve their position in society. Some African American leaders saw areas where African Americans could improve themselves through vocational training and work successfully in the Jim Crow South. Critics wanted to promote the smartest and showcase the intelligence of African Americans as humans on par with any other individual. During Reconstruction with the creation of schools for African American children, Southerners sought to keep schools segregated. Jim Crow laws made this segregation legal. Southern states could barely afford to fund white schools, but set aside money to operate separate systems for black and white students.Following the end of Reconstruction and Redemption of Southern whites, political leaders sought to reform voting rights in order to disenfranchise African American voters. This task had to be approached with the understanding that they could not violate the Fifteenth Amendment, which gave all men the right to vote regardless of race. Throughout the South, states passed literacy tests, poll taxes, and reinvigorated property qualifications to restrict the privilege of voting. These amendments disfranchised many poor people, regardless of race. Neither poor whites nor blacks owned property, and many could not pay the poll tax and were less literate. In 1882, South Carolina passed the Eight Box Law, which placed power in hands of white poll workers who could assist illiterate white voters and ignore black voters.In order to re-enfranchise poor white voters in 1898, Louisiana adopted a clause that stipulated only men who had been eligible to vote before 1867—or whose father or grandfather had been eligible in that year—were allowed to vote. This excluded African Americans without mentioning race. Because most black men had just emerged from slavery in 1867, this reduced the number of black voters to just one percent of 1896 numbers. This clause was eventually invalidated by the Supreme Court in 1915.