Description

Introduction 

(textbook link: https://openstax.org/books/us-history/pages/1-intr…)

Primary sources are eyewitness accounts of historical events. As such, they are precious to historians since they provide a fly-on-the-wall glimpse of history in the making by those who witnessed that history.

Though I don’t expect you to be an expert on analyzing primary sources immediately, by the end of our course, you will be.

This assignment grows out of the article I assigned earlier in the semester — “Windows on the Past: Primary Sources and Why They’re Important.” That reading contains two videos showing you how historians source their documents and the types of questions they ask about them. You cannot do well on this assignment unless you’ve read the earlier article and viewed the videos. They will help you in the work that lies ahead in the course.

What also will help you is reading the assigned reading for this week BEFORE you tackle this assignment. That reading that will give you the context or backstory to this document. That backstory will provide important clues to your understanding of this document. When I come to grade your work, I will look to see if you used the assigned reading in your primary source analysis.

The Primary Source Question Set

The following question set will be used in almost all of our primary source analyses. It contains the questions that all historians ask of their primary sources as they seek to do what I ask you to do in examining primary sources in our course: to understand the past. Here are those questions:

Source the document. That is, who (or what) wrote or produced this source? How do you know? When was the source made? It’s important to know, as precisely as possible, what was going on at the time. List three important events from our history textbook that occurred at about the same time that this document was created.

In at least 250 words, summarize the key points of the source. Put your answer entirely in your own words. Quote nothing. For this question, do not editorialize, contextualize, or blame. Fasten on the document and tell us in your own words what is being said by the maker of the source. Your goal here is accuracy: be faithful to the source.

Using only this document and our assigned reading, who was the probable audience for this source? That is, to whom was this document aimed at? Using the document and its context, using the textbook to learn of its context, justify your answer. 

What Larger Themes of those listed in the “Principal Themes in Our Class” does this source link to and shed light on? List at least two linkages and discuss the connections as persuasively as you can. If more linkages exist, discuss them. 

What is most memorable about this source for you – you personally? 

The Assignment

Please read the following primary source as a historian might — in order to better understand the past. As you read, answer the questions in the Primary Source Question Set as they pertain to this historical document. Then submit your answers by the deadline in your Initial Post.

Next, respond to the Initial Post of another in your Response Post in ONE Response Post. The deadlines for each type of post are given at the top of this assignment.

The Primary Source

The Supreme Court Affirms the Rights of Undocumented Immigrants
Date:1982

[Editor’s Annotation: In 1982, the Supreme Court overturned a Texas statute which withheld funding from local school districts for the education of children who were not “legally admitted” into the United States, and which authorized local school districts to deny enrollment to such children, as a violation the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment.]

[The Primary Source – start]

The Fourteenth Amendment provides that “[n]o State shall . . . deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.” Appellants argue at the outset that undocumented aliens, because of their immigration status, are not “persons within the jurisdiction” of the State of Texas, and that they therefore have no right to the equal protection of Texas law. We reject this argument. Whatever his status under the immigration laws, an alien is surely a “person” in any ordinary sense of that term. Aliens, even aliens whose presence in this country is unlawful, have long been recognized as “persons” guaranteed due process of law by the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments….

Public education is not a “right” granted to individuals by the Constitution. But neither is it merely some governmental “benefit” indistinguishable from other forms of social welfare legislation. Both the importance of education in maintaining our basic institutions, and the lasting impact of its deprivation on the life of the child, mark the distinction. The “American people have always regarded education and [the] acquisition of knowledge as matters of supreme importance.” We have recognized “the public schools as a most vital civic institution for the preservation of a democratic system of government,” and as the primary vehicle for transmitting “the values on which our society rests.” “[A]s . . . pointed out early in our history, . . . some degree of education is necessary to prepare citizens to participate effectively and intelligently in our open political system if we are to preserve freedom and independence.”…In addition, education provides the basic tools by which individuals might lead economically productive lives to the benefit of us all. In sum, education has a fundamental role in maintaining the fabric of our society. We cannot ignore the significant social costs borne by our Nation when select groups are denied the means to absorb the values and skills upon which our social order rests.

In addition to the pivotal role of education in sustaining our political and cultural heritage, denial of education to some isolated group of children poses an affront to one of the goals of the Equal Protection Clause: the abolition of governmental barriers presenting unreasonable obstacles to advancement on the basis of individual merit. Paradoxically, by depriving the children of any disfavored group of an education, we foreclose the means by which that group might raise the level of esteem in which it is held by the majority. But more directly, “education prepares individuals to be self-reliant and self-sufficient participants in society.”

[end]

Source: Plyler v. Doe, June 15, 1982